Integralism and Ralliement

Laodicea

Ralliement

“[T]he principle of the separation of the State and Church … is equivalent to the separation of human legislation from Christian and divine legislation. We do not care to interrupt Ourselves here in order to demonstrate the absurdity of such a separation; each one will understand for himself. As soon as the State refuses to give to God what belongs to God, by a necessary consequence it refuses to give to citizens that to which, as men, they have a right; as, whether agreeable or not to accept, it cannot be denied that man’s rights spring from his duty toward God. Whence if follows that the State, by missing in this connection the principal object of its institution, finally becomes false to itself by denying that which is the reason of its own existence. These superior truths are so clearly proclaimed by the voice of even natural reason, that they…

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The all-natural, organic conundrum

I was in Sprouts Market the other day and noticed the decor. It was made up to be like the interior of a barn or an outdoor farmers market. The way they achieved that effect was to use a lot of unfinished wood and green and orange paint. Sprouts sells of a lot of organic stuff, all-natural this and no-hormones that. Evidently people who shop there like this kind of thing: farms, wood, nature. They’re concerned about things like global warming, industrialization and de-forestation.

I wondered if this presents a conundrum for them: They like to be surrounded with natural materials, not synthetics. All-natural cotton or hemp clothing, and natural, not synthetic wood furnishings. But all this wooden decor means that trees had to be cut down to make it. Either that or you have to manufacture fake wood finishings. Isn’t this a damned-if-you-do, damned-if-you-don’t situation?

In the last couple of years on HGTV there has been a show about “tiny houses”. At first the idea was to build homes with just the bare minimum of space needed to live in, so you have less area to heat and cool, cutting down on your “carbon footprint”. But then the trend started turning towards tiny houses on wheels. That way you could up and relocate without much trouble, or travel around and see new places while taking your home with you.

This is what we old folks used to call a motor home or a trailer.

The problem with motor homes and trailers is that they are industrially mass produced. And that’s bad. Plus they use big engines to haul themselves around, causing a lot of pollution. Huge carbon footprint. Much better to live in an all-natural tiny home. That you haul around with a truck. With a big engine.

Not only must mobile tiny homes be hauled around with trucks, but something made entirely of all-natural wood is heavy. Industrial-scale RV manufacturers have spent decades figuring out the lightest, most efficient materials with which to build motor homes — aluminum and plastic are generally lighter than wood — and also have designed them to be reasonably streamlined, all of which translates to lower fuel consumption. Whereas not only are tiny homes on wheels made entirely of wood, they’re also not designed with aerodynamics in mind. Usually they’re just big, heavy (but fashionable!) wooden boxes on wheels.

Again the conundrum: Mass-produced items are efficiently produced items, efficient to make and efficient to use. The manufacturers have every incentive to make them so, in order to increase both sales, and profits on sales. But people who build their own mobile tiny homes out of all-natural wood — who evidently can’t bring themselves to go RV shopping — what is their incentive?

Adoremus in Aeternum

I heard this song at Mass this morning (with my son in the choir). Lovely and inspiring.

Adoremus in aeternum Sanctissimum Sacramentum.
Laudate Dominum Omnes Gentes
Laudate Eum Omnes Populi
Quoniam confirmata est super nos misericordia eius
Et veritas Domini manet in aeternum.
Gloria Patri Et Filio et Spiritui Sancto
Sicut erat in Principio et Nunc et Semper et in saecula saeculorum. Amen.
Adoremus in aeternum Sanctissimum Sacramentum.

We will adore for eternity the most holy Sacrament.
Praise the Lord, all ye nations: praise Him all ye peoples.
Because his mercy is confirmed upon us:
and the truth of the Lord remains forever.
Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Ghost:
As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.
We will adore for eternity the most holy Sacrament.
Praise the Lord, all ye nations: praise Him all ye peoples.

 

The Pope suddenly learns circumspection

Pope Francis’ non-response this weekend [regarding the Viganò letter] is especially frustrating, considering his penchant for sloppily expressed public positions that routinely lead to misleading and poorly informed news cycles. When it comes to climate change, immigration reform, priestly celibacy, same-sex marriage, weapons manufacturers, etc., Francis is often willing to rush in, as critics might put it, without too much circumspection.

In fact, in the very same press conference this weekend where he refused to comment on the Vigano letter, Francis was quick to answer a question about what parents should do should they learn their child is gay.

Becket Adams, Washington Examiner, 8/30/18.

H/T to Fr. Z.

The bishops lack faith

There is a connection between the bishops’ and pastors’ failure to preach sin and repentance, and the sex scandals. The failure to preach indicates a lack of belief in sin and punishment. That lack of belief deprives them of an adequate incentive to resist temptation. If they believed, they would preach sin and repentance as if souls depended upon it, and they would resist sin as if their own souls depended upon it. Some bishops do preach sin and repentance, but they’re a minority. The problems in the Church boil down to this, which is in essence a lack of faith.

Current events

If Pope Francis really is claiming that capital punishment is intrinsically evil, then either scripture, the Fathers and Doctors of the Church, and all previous popes were wrong—or Pope Francis is. There is no third alternative. Nor is there any doubt about who would be wrong in that case.

Edward Feser, “Pope Francis and Capital Punishment,” FirstThings.com, August 3, 2018.